Category Archives: Reminders

2015 Income tax rates

Canadian Tax Brackets 2015 | Income Tax Bracketsimages 2

  • 15% on the first $44,701 of taxable income
  • 22% on the next $44,702 of taxable income (on the portion of taxable income between $44,702 and $89,401)
  • 26%on the next $89,402 of taxable income (on the portion of taxable income between $89,402 and $138,586)
  • 29% of taxable income over $138,586



1.  RRSP deadline – March 1, 2015

2.  Personal Taxes Due – April 30, 2015

3.  Quarterly GST filers – due 30 days after quarter cut-off

4.  Payroll – source deductions due the 15th of the following month deductions are withheld from employees

5.  T2 Corporation Taxes – due no later than six months after your year-end

6.  Make sure to take your odometer reading at year-end for taxes

RRSP Deadline 2015 for 2014 RRSP Contribution

RRSP Deadline 2015 for 2014 Tax Year: March 01, 2015

Your RRSP deadline for contributing to your RRSP for the 2014 tax year has to be before March 01, 2015.

You may contribute to your RRSP until December 31 of the year in which you reach age 71. The following limits and deadlines apply annually.

Maximum Annual RRSP Contribution Limits

Year Contribution limit
2011 $22,450
2012 $22,970
2013 $23,820
2014 $24,270
2015 $24,930

Your allowable RRSP contribution for the current year is the lower of:

  • 18% of your earned income from the previous year, or
  • The maximum annual contribution limit for the taxation year, or
  • The remaining limit after any company sponsored pension plan contributions.

Earned income includes salary or wages, alimony received, and rental income, among other income sources, but does not include items such as investment income.

Company Pension Plan or Deferred Profit Sharing Plan – As a member of a company–sponsored registered pension plan or deferred profit sharing plan, the amount that you can contribute to your RRSP must be reduced by the total value of the pension credits you earned for the year.

This amount is referred to as a pension adjustment (PA) and it is reported on the T4 slip (Statement of Remuneration Paid) that you receive from your employer.

Annual Contribution Deadline – To be eligible for an RRSP deduction in a specific taxation year, you can make contributions anytime during the year, or up to 60 days into the following year.


CRA Requirements for Invoices

The CRA’s requirements for invoices depend on the total sale amount.

For sales Under $30, there are 3 pieces of information:
– The name of the business
– The invoice date
– The total amount paid

For sales Between $30 and $149.99, include the above 3 points, plus:
– The total amount of HST/GST charged on the sale
– If the sale has items taxed at different rates, you must show the break-down of the amount of tax at each rate
– The business number of the business issuing the invoice

For sales Over $150, all points above must be included, plus:
– A brief description of the goods or services
– Terms of payment


Tax Tips from Revenue Canada

Tax Tip: Top 10 ways to reduce your tax bill

Did you know…There are a number of ways to reduce the amount of tax you owe and keep more money in your pocket at tax time. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) can help you learn more about the various credits and deductions that you may be entitled to and that can save you money when you file your 2011 income tax and benefit return.

Important facts

For individuals:

1. Plan ahead – Register for My Account, gather your receipts and NETFILE access code, and sign up for direct deposit before April 30. Submitting your income tax and benefit return before the tax-filing deadline means you can avoid having to pay late-filing penalties.

2. Families – Save those receipts! All the activities you have been paying for throughout the year (piano, karate, tutoring, hockey, and more) may save you money at tax time.

3. Tax-free savings account – A tax-free savings account (TFSA) is one great way to save money since you don’t pay tax on any income you earn from investments in your TFSA.

4. Registered retirement savings plan – Any income that you earn in a registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) is exempt from tax, as long as the funds stay in the plan. RRSPs help you save for your retirement and give you a break at tax time too.

5. Public transit tax credit – If you or someone in your family is a regular user of public transit, then you may be able to claim a non-refundable tax credit based on the cost of eligible transit passes.

6. Pension income splitting – If you receive income from a pension, you can split up to 50% of eligible pension income with your spouse or common-law partner to reduce the taxes that you pay.

7. Students – Are you still in school? Students can claim the tuition, education, and textbook amounts. Have you graduated recently? You may be eligible to claim the interest that you paid on your student loans.

8. Child care expenses – If you have children, you may be able to claim child care expenses that you or your spouse or common-law partner paid so that either of you could work, do research, or go to school.

9. Home buyer’s tax credit – If you’re a first-time home buyer you may be eligible to claim $5,000 on the purchase of your new home, which can save you up to $750.

For people who are self-employed:

10. Hiring an apprentice – Did your business employ an apprentice? A salary paid to an employee registered in a prescribed trade in the first two years of his or her apprenticeship contract qualifies for a non-refundable tax credit for the employer.

For the full post please visit the CRA web site.

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